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Title Timetable: The Phoebe Snow. Daylight Trip, New York - Buffalo. Lackawanna R.R. (N.Y.), ca. Oct. 1957.
Object Name Timetable
Catalog Number 2011.005.0095
Collection Hoboken Railroad Collection
Credit Museum Collections. Gift of a friend of the Museum.
Scope & Content Timetable: The Phoebe Snow. Daylight Trip, New York - Buffalo. Lackawanna Railroad (New York), probably October 1957.

Fold-out brochure, 6-1/4" high x 20" wide; folded to 4" wide.

This publication for passengers is an itinerary with details about the route and points of interest. See notes for more about this train and also some text from the schedule. See archives 2011.005.0272 for a copy from 1956 and 2013.005.0202 for one from 1960.

Side 1 has the front and back covers as folded plus promotion of other trains on the westward and eartward routes.

Side 2 is the schedule and points of interest. Publication code at the bottom: 10-27-57-20M. This code indicates a date of October 27, 1957.

Hoboken which is where the rail passage originated or arrived is listed as Mile 1.0 (the railroad based its route on New York City.)
Hoboken is listed as elevation 7; population 50,676 and described as a point of interest:
Most densely populated city in the U.S. One square mile in area. Home of Stevens Institute of Technology.
LACKAWANNA TERMINUS, with Passenger Terminal,
Freight Terminal and Terminal Warehouse, covers
225 acres. Warehouse alone, with more than 1,132,000
square feet of floor space, covers four square city blocks.
WEST END. A junction, after passing through Bergen
Tunnel. Here the diesel-powered Boonton Line, over
which Lackawanna through-freight is handled, branches
off.
Related Records Show Related Records...
Notes The Phoebe Snow. A long distance passenger train that was operated by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad (Lackawanna Railroad) from New York (Hoboken) to Buffalo, 1949 to 1966.

The Lackawanna was known as the The Road of Anthracite (or The Anthracite Road) as well as the The Route of Phoebe Snow (or The Phoebe Snow Route.) A fictional character created for advertising campaigns about 1900, it became the name of a real route with service that started Nov. 15, 1949 and made its last trip starting Nov. 27, 1966 (as the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad; there was a hiatus from 1960 to August 1963.) While New York was listed as the point of departure or arrival, it actually operated from Lackawanna Terminal in Hoboken.

Curiously, schedules listed Hoboken as mile 1.0 from or to New York as the railroad wished to make its service centered on New York City. The mile was taken as the Lackwanna Terminal's distance from the Barclay Street ferry terminal in Manhattan which the railroad owned and operated. (To depart or arrive in New York required a trip on their ferry service or the Hudson & Manhattan Railroad- later PATH - subway.)
_______

Text below is uncorrected OCR scan which does provides some key words although the format is garbled. It is best to refer to the detail images of the schedule side of the sheet.

To our Passengers on The Phoebe Snow:
GOOD MORNING!
We welcome you aboard Lackawanna's ultra-modern streamliner . . .
THE PHOEBE SNOW! Its luxury coaches, Observation-Lounge car and modern dining
car were specially designed and constructed to provide the latest appointments for
your comfort, safety and convenience.
Lackawanna's popular title is THE ROUTE OF PHOEBE SNOW. This folder
is a digest of interesting highlights along this beautiful route. We hope you will con-
sult it often and keep it as a souvenir of your Lackawanna journey.
We wish you a most pleasant trip.
LACKAWANNA RAILROAD
THE ROUTE OF PHOEBE SNOW

STATIONS
(Elevation and Population)
Time shown is DAYLIGHT
SAVING TIME during
Miles
From
New
York
No. 3
To
Buffalo
Read Down
No. 6
To
New York
Read Up
Arrive
Miles
From
Buffalo
POINTS OF INTEREST
Leave
%
Daylijht Saving Period


NEW YORK, N. Y.
1.0
10:35 AM
6:30 PM
(Elev. 17; Pop. 7,891.957)
HOBOKEN, N. J.
10:48 AM
(Stop)
10:55 AM
(Stop)
11:00 AM
11:03 AM
11:08 AM
(Stop)
11:14 AM
6:16 PM
(Stop)
6:07 PM
(Stop)
8.8
11.6
16.2
18.8
21.1
26.5
6:00 PM
5:57 PM
5:54 PM
(Stop)
5:47 PM
(Elev. 7; Pop. 50,678)
NEWARK, N. J.
(Elev. 61; Pop. 438,776)
EAST ORANGE, N. J.
(Elev. 174; Pop. 79,340)
(Station Stop, Brick Church)
MAPLEWOOD, N. J.
(Elev. 139; Pop. 25,201)
SHORT HILLS, N. J.
(Elev. 214; Pop. 6,500)
SUMMIT, N. J.
(Elev 371; Pop. 17,929)
MADISON, N. J.
28.7
30.8
37.3
39.1
48.9
11:16 AM
11:19 AM
5:45 PM
5:42 PM
(Elev. 263; Pop. 10,417)
CONVENT, N. J.
MORRISTOWN, N. J.
11:27 AM
5 :34 PM
11:33 AM
(Stop)
11:42 AM
5:27 PM
(Stop)
5:18 PM
(Elev. 336; Pop. 17,124)
DENVILLE, N. J.
(Elev. 525; Pop. 6,055)
DOVER, N. J.
(Elev. 571; Pop. 11,174)
LAKE HOPATCONG, N. J.
12:04 PM
(Stop)
12:16 PM
65.8
4:57 PM
(Stop)
78.2
4:42 PM
12:26 PM
(Stop)
12:48 PM
(Stop)
1:01 PM
4:35 PM
(Stop)
4:12 PM
(Stop)
4:02 PM
95.6
103.6
1:05 PM
(Stop)
1:50 PM
(Stop)
3:58 PM
(Stop)
3:15 PM
(Stop)
134.1
153.1
162.9
192.7
(Elev. 908; Pop. 639)
BLAIRSTOWN, N. J.
on New Jersey "Cut-Oil"
(Elev. 576; Pop. 1,571)
DELAWARE WATER GAP, Pa
(Elev. 313; Pop. 734)
STROUDSBURGand
EAST STROUDSBURG, PA.
(Elev. 426; Comb. Pop. 13,635)
CRESCO,PA.
(Elev. 1,201; Pop. 350)
MT. POCONO, PA.
(Elev. 1,657; Pop. 619)
POCONO SUMMIT, PA.
(Elev. 1,826; Pop. 297)
SCRANTON, PA.
2:16 PM
2 :46 PM
2:24 PM
3:03 PM
(Stop)
2 :37 PM
2:07 PM
(Stop)
(Elev. 773; Pop. 125,536)
TUNKHANNOCK VIADUCT
(Nicholson, Pa.)
MARTIN'S CREEK VIADUCT
(Kingsley, Pa.)
BINGHAMTON, N. Y.
3.07 PM
3:14 PM
(Stop)
3 :31 PM
(Stop)
3:52 PM
(Stop)
195.4
200.7
213.4
232.0
249.7
267.7
286.6
319.5
333.7
340.3
390.8
396.2
1:53 PM
1:47 PM
(Stop)
1:31 PM
(Stop)
1:08 PM
(Stop)
(Elev. 862; Pop. 80,674)
JOHNSON CITY, N. Y.
(Elev. 854; Pop. 19,249)
VESTAL-END ICOTT, N. Y.
(Elev. 828; Comb. pop. 28,952)
OWEGO, N. Y.
(Elev. 813; Pop. 5,350)
WAVERLY, N. Y.
4:15 PM
(Stop)
12:48 PM
(Stop)
12:23 PM
(Stop)
(Elev. 823; Pop. 6,037)
ELMIRA, N. Y.
4:35 PM
(Stop)
4:56 PM
(Stop)
5 :29 PM
(Stop)
(Elev. 854; Pop. 49,716)
CORNING, N. Y.
12 :03 PM
(Stop)
11:28 AM
(Stop)
(Elev. 955; Pop. 17,684)
BATH, N. Y.
(Elev. 1,099; Pop. 5,416)
5 :48 PM
(Stop)
5:56 PM
11 :11 AM
(Stop)
11:00 AM
6:45 PM
10:14 AM
7:05 PM
Arrive
10:05 AM
Leave
DANSVILLE, N. Y.
(Elev. 1,023; Pop. 5,253)
MOUNT MORRIS, N. Y.
(Elev. 576; Pop. 3,450)
GREIGSVILLE, N. Y.
(Elev. 759; Pop. 45)
EAST BUFFALO, N. Y.
10:15 AM
(Barclay
St.
Ferry)
6:55 PM
( Barclay
St.
Ferry)
BUFFALO, N. Y.
(Elev. 601; Pop. 580,132)
Over three million people enter and leave New York City
daily. Its famous skyline is viewed by thousands of pas-
sengers on Lackawanna ferry boats plying between Ho-
boken and New York City. Lackawanna is second of
New Jersey railroads in the number of commuters trans-
ported to and from Greater New York.
Most densely populated city in the U. S. One square mile
n area. Home of Stevens Institute of Technology.
LACKAWANNA TERMINUS, with Passenger Termi-
nal, Freight Terminal and Terminal Warehouse, covers
225 acres. Warehouse alone, with more than 1,132,000
square feet of floor space, covers four square city blocks.
WEST END. A junction, after passing through Bergen
Tunnel. Here the diesel-powered Boonton Line, over
which Lackawanna through-freight is handled, branches
off.
The metropolis of N. J., a great manufacturing, business
and professional center.
City of beautiful homes and modern apartments, this is
one of the finest suburban sections near New York City.
$ 1.000,000 municipal center opposite Lackawanna East
Orange Station.
Incorporated in 1922, Maplewood is the youngest and one
of the most progressive suburban communities.
Baltusrol Golf Club, suburban homes and mountain
estates.
On crest of First Watchung Mountain, a barrier against
British in Revolutionary War. Kent Place School
for Girls, Oak Knoll School of the Holy Child, Canoe
Brook Country Club, Bell Telephone Laboratories at
nearby Murray Hill.
Suburban community with rich historical background.
Known as "The Rose City" because of its numerous
greenhouses. Million-dollar Municipal Bldg. opp. Lacka-
wanna Station is gift of Mrs. Marcellus Hartley Dodge,
as memorial to her son. Seat of Drew University and
Theological Seminary.
Historical College of St. Elizabeth, first Catholic women's
college to confer degrees.
Historical Colonial town where Washington spent two
winters during Revolutionary War. In Morristown Na-
tional Historical Park are Ford House Museum, Fort
Nonsense, Jockey Hollow and Tempe Wick House. First
Morse magnetic telegraph demonstration 1838.
Famous lake district and summer resort. Junction of
Morristown Line and Boonton Line. Estling Lake on
left*, Indian Lake on right*.
A thriving industrial town. Lackawanna suburban elec-
tric line Terminus.
9 miles long with 40 miles of shore line, this lake is a
beautiful and popular summer resort.
NEW JERSEY "CUT-OFF", great modern engineering
feat, between Lake Hopatcong and Slateford Junction,
Pa. Over 28 miles long; has world's largest railroad
embankment, concrete viaducts over Paulin's Kill and
Delaware River.
Note panoramic view of Kittatinny Range where Dela-
ware River cuts through to form the famous Delaware
Water Gap. Blair Academy (boys preparatory school)
here.
Village named for the Gap (see Blairstown). Baedeker
calls this one of the 15 points of greatest scenic beauty in
the U. S. Mt. Minsi on left*, Mt. Tammany on right*.
300.6
243.1
233.3
203.5
Two thriving towns at the foothills of the Poconos.
Gateway to Pocono Mountain resorts. Station for Moun-
tain Home, Canadensis, Buck Hill Falls and Skytop.
In the heart of the Poconos. See the magnificent view of
rolling hills and valleys. Delaware Water Gap in the
distance.
Station for Pocono resorts-Pocono Manor, Pocono Crest,
Pocono Pines.
Hemmed in by mountains, Scranton, the capital city of
the anthracite mining industry, lies in the Lackawanna
Valley. Also iron and steel products, textiles, Lackawanna
Diesel Locomotive and Repair Shop. International Cor-
respondence School, University of Scranton, Marywood
College.
LACKAWANNA STATION, French Renaissance archi-
tecture, designed by Edward Langley c£ Scranton and
Kenneth Murchinson of New York. Interior enriched
with marble and Grueby tile ornamentation and 36 murals
showing scenes along the Lackawanna route.
Largest concrete railroad bridge in the world. Length
2,375 feet; height, 240 feet above valley and 300 feet
above bed rock foundations.
Total length over all of 1,600 feet, 150 feet above bed of
creek. Viaduct consists of 11 spans.
Attractive residential, civic and commercial center and
metropolis of the Triple Cities . . . Binghamton, Johnson
City, Endicott. Confluence of Susquehanna and Chenango
Rivers.
JUNCTION of LACKAWANNA MAIN LINE and
SYRACUSE and UTICA BRANCH LINES.
200.8 Pioneer plant of Endicott-Johnson Corp., world's second
largest shoe factory.
195.5 Headquarters and several factories of Endicott-Johnson
Corp., and of International Business Machines Cor-
poration.
182.8 Southeastern gateway to the Beautiful Finger Lakes
region. Connecting point for Ithaca.
164.2 This town has the advantages of rich Chemung and Tioga
Valley farmlands. Rich also in Indian lore and Revolu-
tionary history. Spanish Hill, the fortress of the Red
Men, is located here.
146.5 Important manufacturing and commercial center located
on both sides of the Chemung River. College for Women,
State Reformatory, and the Mark Twain Study on cam-
pus of Elmira College where humorist wrote between
1874 and 1903. Mark Twain is buried in Woodlawn
Cemetery, Elmira.
128.5Glass making is this city's principal industry. The new
Corning Glass Center is a place you will want to visit.
Here was made the 200-inch Mount Palomar Observatory
telescope, largest single piece of glass ever cast.
109.6Steuben county seat, gateway to great wine-producing
country. U. S. Veteran Administration Hospital here.
76.7 Note magnificent panoramic view of the Genesee Valley.
Here Clara Barton founded the first local chapter of the
62.5
55.9
5.4
0
American Red Cross. Bernarr [Bernard] Macfadden Health Resort
can be seen from car windows;
Genesee River; large canning industries.
International Salt Company's Retsof Mine, largest rock
salt mine in the U.S.A. Its perimeter of 15 miles encom-
passes tunnels more than 2 -1/2 miles long - a quarter-mile
below the surface.
Locomotive and car repair shops of the Lackawanna
Railroad; large classification yard for freight distribution.
Eighth among the nation's industrial centers and second
largest railroad center. Buffalo (on Lake Erie) is the
New York Harbor of the Great Lakes. Residential sec-
tions are noted for broad avenues, mansions, modern
apartments, beautiful churches, parks and parkways.
Former home of Presidents Fillmore and Cleveland.
LACKAWANNA RAILROAD TERMINAL is also
station for the Nickel Plate Railroad. Adjacent to
Terminal are docks of the Great Lakes Steamship Lines.
396.2
395.2
389.8
387.0
382.4
379.8
377.5
372.1
369.9
367.8
361.3
357.1
347.3
330.4
318.0
313.6



*- Direction indicated on Westward trip. On Eastward trip "left" becomes "right", etc.
RELAX IN THE OBSERVATION-LOUNGE CAR

For your day-time leisure, the Observation-Lounge car open to all passen-
gers, provides additional comfort aboard The Phoebe Snow. The Observation-
Lounge car is of latest design, thoughtfully and richly furnished with deep,
soft easy chairs . . . tables and settees . . . magazine library . . . refresh-
ment bar and many other conveniences that add to the pleasure of your trip.
10-27-57-20M
Date 1957
Year Range from 1957
Year Range to 1957
Search Terms Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad
Lackawanna Railroad
Phoebe Snow (train)
Caption front as folded
Imagefile 091\20110050095.TIF
Classification Transportation
Railroads
Travel
Business & Commerce
Geography