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Title Catalog / yearbook: Stevens School. June, 1919. 6th St. at Park Ave., Hoboken, N.J.
Object Name Catalog
Catalog Number 2011.001.0003
MULTIMEDIA LINKS CLICK HERE to view the PDF; note - please be patient while file opens.
Collection Stevens Preparatory School Collection
Credit Museum Collections.
Scope & Content Stevens School. June, 1919. Sixth Street at Park Avenue, Hoboken, New Jersey. Booklet, 6" wide x 8" high, sewn printed wrappers, 48 pp. plus 6 photo illustrations inserted. PDF on file. All pages imaged; full text is in notes.

The publication was the catalog for this preparatory school for boys, but also a yearbook for the 1917-1918 school year with the second half having commencement details, awards and prizes, school activities, student council, honor roll and lists of students in all classes with their hometown.

(See related: archives 2011.001.0004 for a 1921 issue which is selectively imaged with the school activities, student list and team photos. The text differs in some from the one here as faculty changed, tuition increased, curriculum revised; basketball team photo replaced the lacrosse team as one of the team photos and noted for that team - "The Hoboken Turn Hall, one-half block away, is used during the winter for basket ball.")

It documents the first year of its activities as an essentially new organization. Stevens Institute of Technology, where the school was founded in 1870, was the owner and provider of facilities up to 1917. A short history of the school relates this relationship and the new one as it re-organized as an institution separated from the college (which maintained oversight through an agreement and Advisory Board.) It states how it opened at this location on Sept. 17, 1917 with the furnishings and equipment from Stevens and even who had control of the sports trophies from previous years. The school moved to the building known as the Martha Institute and as Hoboken High School which occupied it until 1910 when it moved to a new building at Fourth and Garden.

There are several hundred names found in the student list and a very small number were Hoboken residents.

Six photographic illustrations are not in pagination:

[1] frontispiece, Stevens School; a common exterior photo of the building
[2] opposite page 9, Assembly Hall; interior view of students in study seated on deacon's benches
[3] opposite page 17, Chemical Laboratory
[4] opposite page 32, Lacrosse Team, 1918
[5] opposite page 40, Football Team, 1918
[6] opposite page 48, Baseball Team, 1918

Photos 4 and 5 by William Manewal with credit seen in image.

Also notable is the class structure:
senior
upper middle
lower middle
junior
Related Records Show Related Records...
Notes Archives 2011.001.0003

STEVENS SCHOOL
JUNE, 1919
SIXTH STREET AT PARK AVENUE
HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY

CONTENTS
ADMISSION10
ADVISORY BOARD4
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION33
ATHLETICS36
CALENDAR42
CERTIFICATES30
CLASS ORGANIZATIONS41
COMMENCEMENT32
CURRICULUM13
DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS14
DIPLOMAS30
EXAMINATIONS31
EXCUSES26
FACULTY5,22
HOME WORK 30
HONOR ROLLS39
HONORS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES34
LOCATION AND BUILDING9
MANAGEMENT8
PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE28
RATES OF TUITION12
REPORTS31
SESSIONS.25
STUDENT ACTIVITIES36
STUDENT COUNCIL38
STUDENTS43

ADVISORY BOARD
ALEXANDER C. HUMPHREYS, ME., Sc.D., LL.D.
President, Stevens Institute of Technology
FRANCIS J. POND, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Morton Memorial
Laboratory, Stevens Institute of Technology
FREDERICK L. PRYOR, M.E.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Superintendent of Build-
ings and Grounds, Stevens Institute of Technology

FACULTY
B. F. CARTER, A.M., PRINCETON
Head Master
FRANK J. DAVEY, M.D., LONG ISLAND
MATHEMATICS AND SENIOR ENGLISH
ERWIN W. GROVE, PH.B., LAFAYETTE
SCIENCE AND HISTORY
JOHN W. McCORMACK, A.M., MIDDLEBURY
SCIENCE AND FREE HAND DRAWING
HENRY P. SCRATCHLEY, A.M., B.D., GRISWOLD
MATHEMATICS
JEROME L. ICERBECK, B.S., A.M., COLUMBIA
ENGLISH AND HISTORY
DONALD W. HENRY, A.B., LAFAYETTE
LANGUAGES
LEON E. DANIELS, A.B., UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT
LANGUAGES
JOSEPH F. SULLIVAN, BUFFALO STATE NORMAL
MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE
5

JOHN R. IRWIN, PH.B., LAFAYETTE
MATHEMATICS AND ENGLISH
SAMUEL H. LOTT, M.E., STEVENS INSTITUTE
Assistant Professor, Stevens Institute
MECHANICAL DRAWING
LOUELLA J. BENSON
Secretary
6

STEVENS SCHOOL
STEVENS SCHOOL, founded in 1870 by the Trustees
of Stevens Institute of Technology, has had a long and
successful existence. It was one of the first schools in
the country to offer satisfactory training in Mathematics and Science, as it introduced into its curriculum at the beginning several novel features, one of which was the teaching of
two mathematical subjects during the same year.
For several years past, Stevens Institute had grown so rapidly
in numbers on account of admission by certificate as well as by
examination, that part of the school building on River Street had
been occupied by the Institute classes and, in October, 1916, the
Trustees decided, with regret, that they would need the whole
building as a recitation hall, the change to take effect in September, 1917.

At once, Mr. B. F. Carter and Mr. L. G. Saunders, for many
years members of the Faculty, started to make arrangements to
continue the School in a new location. They were fortunate in
securing the former Hoboken High School building, and Stevens
School opened on September 17,1917, for the first year under the
new management. The Head Masters enjoyed the co-operation
of the Trustees of the Institute and the assistance of many of the
former excellent Faculty.

Co-operation of Stevens Institute
The Trustees wished the close relations between the Institute and School to continue and Dr.
Alexander C. Humphreys, President of the
Faculty and Board of Trustees, sent to patrons
a letter embodying their views, in which he says:

"Our co-operation will take definite form as follows:
1.The School can continue to be known as Stevens School.
2.An advisory board will be appointed from the Institute
Faculty, to exercise an oversight of the administration of the
School at least for the next three years, that is, until the students
now in the School have had the opportunity to graduate.
3.At least for the same period, one free scholarship in the
Institute each year will be, as before, open to competition.
4.Certain parts of the equipment of the School, including the
physical and chemical apparatus, will be placed at the disposal of
the new organization, so long as the School is conducted to meet
our views.
5.The athletic trophies of our School shall be placed in the
keeping of the new Stevens School under the same conditions as
stipulated in No. 4.
"With these facts presented, the Trustees extend to the new
enterprise their best wishes for the greatest measure of success
with the hope and belief that it will maintain the traditions and
high educational standards of the old School, and that a close and
friendly relation will be cultivated and maintained between the
new School and the Institute.
"Finally, on behalf of the Trustees, I express the hope that the
students now enrolled in the School will enroll as members of the
new School."
Since June, 1918, the School has been under the sole direction
of the Head Master, as Mr. Saunders resigned his position at
that time.


LOCATION AND BUILDING
Location
The School occupies the former Hoboken High
School building, called the Martha Institute, at the
corner of Sixth Street and Park Avenue. It is easily accessible
from all points in metropolitan New York and New Jersey, as
it is only thirteen minutes' walk from the Hudson Tubes Ter-
minal, the Lackawanna Terminal, the Barclay, Christopher and
Fourteenth Street ferries. In addition, it is but three short blocks
from the Washington Street trolley line, and one block from the
Willow Avenue line, to both of which transfers may be obtained
from the Jersey City, Weehawken, West Hoboken, and Union
Hill lines and all through lines entering Hoboken.
Building
The large brick building is well adapted for school
purposes, situated as it is on a corner, with light
and air on all four sides and on streets paved with asphalt or
wood blocks. Every classroom is well ventilated and lighted, not
only by large windows, but also by electric light for dark and
stormy days.
The whole building is thoroughly renovated and put in the best
of condition, the heating plant overhauled and additional radiation
installed. There are five fire exits and a wide fire escape with
regular steps, leading from the top floor.
On the ground floor is a large assembly hall where the School
gathers for singing and public speaking, for addresses by men of
influence in various lines, for reports of athletic activities and
for meetings that tend to develop esprit de corps. In this way,
each student realizes that he is an integral part of the school,
while section and class feeling merge into school loyalty.
On the floors above the hall are nine classrooms, two large lab-
oratories, a reading room, office, and lunchrooms.
9


ASSEMBLY HALL

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Applicants for admission to the Junior Class must have com-
pleted the courses of study in the grammar grades. They are
admitted without examination on presentation of a diploma.
Applicants for admission to the higher classes must take exami-
nations on the work of the classes below the one they wish to
enter, or present certificates from the schools previously attended,
stating that they have passed satisfactory examinations in the
subjects mentioned. Such certificates are essential also in giving
credit for admission to college.
It is important that application be made as early as possible.
As a personal interview is much more satisfactory than a letter,
the applicant is requested to see the Head Master in person, when-
ever convenient. It is hoped, also, that parents will accompany
their sons on the first visit to the School.
Students, if properly qualified, are received at any time, but
the advantages of the boys who enter at the beginning of the
school year or of the second term are obvious. It is noticed,
also, that those who enter early in the school course are better
prepared for the higher classes, both in mental training and in
the completeness of their scholastic preparation, than those who
enter the School later.

Registration days will be as follows: June 4 to
BagsJune 30; August 25 to September 12, 1919. Office
hours, 9 to 4.
Students should bring with them, if possible at the first inter-
view, credentials from other schools attended, in order that their
courses may be arranged with an exact knowledge of what they
need.
10

Examinations for admission will be held on September 11 and
12, 1919.

Assignment to Classes
On account of the flexibility of the system of instruction,
it is possible for a student to take different
subjects with several classes. Because of this, the
student's state of preparation is the guide of assignments to
classes: in each subject he is placed in the class for which he is
prepared. This is especially true of the languages-Latin, French,
Spanish, or German-in which the degree of advancement fre-
quently bears no relation to the preparation of the student in
Science or Mathematics.
Assignments to classes are provisional: if at any time the
student's interests demand a readjustment of schedule, this will
be made, in order that the best results may be secured.
11

RATES OF TUITION
The tuition for the two lower classes is $150 per annum; for
the Upper Middle and Senior years, $300 per annum.
These amounts are payable in two equal installments, not later
than two weeks after the beginning of each term. Students enter-
ing at any time within six weeks after the beginning of the term
are charged full tuition. No deductions are made for absence ex-
cept on account of illness and then only when the absence has con-
tinued for half a term. In such cases the loss is divided equally
between the School and the parents. No refund is allowed for
pupils withdrawing from the School after the first four weeks of a
term for other reasons than sickness.
Each student is required, upon admission, to make a deposit of
$5 to apply on the purchase of text-books and supplies, unex-
pended balances to be returned upon graduation or the withdrawal
of the student.
In order to defray, partially, the cost of the maintenance of
athletics, an annual athletic fee of $5 is charged each student.
12
CURRICULUM
JUNIOR CLASS
Both Terms
Algebra-5 periods; Physiography-5 periods; English-5
periods; Foreign Language-5 periods; Free Hand Drawing-1
period.
LOWER MIDDLE CLASS
Both Terms
Algebra-3 periods; Biology-4 periods; English-4 periods;
English History-4 periods; Foreign Language-o periods; Free
Hand Drawing-1 period.
UPPER MIDDLE CLASS
Both Terms
Plane Geometry-5 periods; Chemistry-4 periods; Chemical
Laboratory-2 periods; English-d: periods; United States His-
tory and Civics-4 periods; Foreign Language-5 periods.
SENIOR CLASS
First Term
Intermediate Algebra-4 periods; Solid Geometry or Plane
Trigonometry-5 periods; Physics-4 periods; Physical Labora-
tory-2 periods; English-4 periods; Foreign Language-5 pe-
riods ; Mechanical Drawing-1 period.
Second Term
Intermediate Algebra-4 periods; Higher Algebra (for ad-
vanced students)-4 periods; Plane Trigonometry or Solid Geom-
etry-5 periods; Physics-4 periods; Physical Laboratory-2
periods; English-4 periods; Foreign Language-5 periods;
Mechanical Drawing-1 period.
13

DESCRIPTION OF SUBJECTS
ENGLISH
The study of English in the School has two main objects: (1)
command of correct, clear English, spoken and written; (2)
ability to read with intelligence and appreciation.
The first object requires instruction in grammar and composi-
tion. During the first two years of the course, there is a gram-
matical review based on Lewis and Hosic's Practical English.
At the same time the principles of composition are taken up and
applied in oral and written exercises. During the last two years,
Brooks' Composition is used as a text-book to teach more ad-
vanced principles in connection with themes and essays.
Spelling is taught not only in English but also in all other
courses. For this purpose, special lists of words for each subject
have been prepared by the Head Master. A Word Book is also
used.
The second object is sought by reading classics selected from
the list issued by the Committee on College Entrance Require-
ments and, in the Senior year, by intensive study of several
books named for admission to college, with greater stress laid on
style, the meaning of words and phrases, and the close study of
allusions.
The following books have been read, either wholly or in part,
during 1918-1919.
In the Junior Class: Treasure Island, Short Stories, Pope's
The Odyssey, Midsummer-Night's Dream.
In the Lower Middle Class: Oregon Trail, Julius Caesar, Idylls
of the King, Silas Marner.
14
In the Upper Middle Class: Clive, Twelfth Night, Deserted Vil-
lage, Gray's Poems, World War Aims and Ideals.
In the Senior Class: Macbeth, Milton's Minor Poems, Burke on
Conciliation with America, Macaulay's Life of Johnson.

Supplementary reading is required of all students
in the three lower classes. Printed lists are
given to the boys from which they select books
on the war, poetry, drama, fiction or non-fiction, reporting to the
Master on each one read or writing out an outline to be corrected.
Assembly declamation is also a part of the English course.
MATHEMATICS

Algebra
A majority of the students of Stevens School are
preparing to take engineering courses in college.
For such pupils a thorough training in Algebra is absolutely essen-
tial. The workman must be thoroughly conversant with his tools
and the pupil is never allowed to forget that his knowledge of
Algebra is a tool which he must use with readiness and precision
in his college mathematics. The time devoted to this subject is
much greater than in the majority of schools.
Throughout the course two ideas are especially emphasized-
application of principles and accuracy of workmanship. The
instructor leads the pupil to discover the principles inductively.
After a principle is explained, many problems are solved in order
that the pupil may learn to apply the principle. Accuracy is se-
cured by requiring checking of results. The student is led to
see that the benefit in the correct solution of a problem lies in
the fact that he has consciously and correctly applied one or more
principles. He is required to tell, not only how he solved it, but
why he solved it as he did, and, in addition, to prove that his
result is accurate by an adequate check. Many practical problems
15

are thus solved so that by frequent repetition what has once been
learned will not be forgotten.
The result of the course, therefore, is to fix the principles in
the student's mind, to teach him when and how to apply these
principles, and to make him confident of the accuracy of his work
through the use of checks.
Advanced Algebra is taught in the second term of the Senior
Class for those who need it for college entrance and for others
who, although the subject is not required, yet wish to be more
than ordinarily well prepared in Algebra.
The text-books used have been the First Course in Algebra by
Hawkes, Luby, and Touton, Complete Course in Algebra, by the
same authors, and Higher Algebra by Hawkes.

Geometry
In the teaching of Geometry, the aim of the instruc-
tion is to develop and strengthen the power to
originate and carry on a logical train of thought. To this end
many original exercises are employed and frequent carefully
graded tests given.
Plane Geometry is given five times a week throughout the
Upper Middle year. It is preceded by a short course in geometri-
cal concepts, taught at the end of the Lower Middle year in con-
nection with Algebra. Solid Geometry is taught five periods per
week throughout either term of the Senior year. The text-
book is Schultze and Sevenoak's Plane and Solid Geometry.

Trignonometry
A knowledge of Plane Trigonometry is of prime
importance to the boy who contemplates an en-
gineering course. This is the determining factor in the selection
of topics to be treated and in the relative amount of time as-
signed to each. Much drill work is given upon those parts of the
subject which should be remembered for use in college courses.
This subject is given five periods a week during either term
12


of the Senior year. The text-book used has been Granville's
Plane Trigonometry.

SCIENCE
An important feature of the school course is the introduction
of some branch of Science into the work of each year.

Physiography
In the Junior year, Physiography is studied with
the purpose of arousing an interest in natural ob-
jects and the common things of life. Even more important, it is
believed, than the information gained is the formation of the habit
of close observation. Besides the study of Dryer's Physical
Geography, Parts I and II, laboratory experiments are made to de-
termine the latitude of the city, the weather reports are worked
out in a practical manner, and government maps of New York,
New Jersey, Niagara Falls, Mt. Shasta, the Mississippi Delta and
other places are studied with a view to accurate map reading.

Biology
In the Lower Middle Class, Biology is taught with
Smallwood's Practical Biology as a text. The idea
is kept constantly in mind that a boy should understand the rela-
tion of plants and animals to one another and to man. The eco-
nomic value of plants and animals is studied. Special emphasis
is placed upon personal hygiene and public sanitation as well as
upon the use of protective medicine. Laboratory exercises are
given in order to fix firmly in the student's mind the subject under
consideration. Lectures on special subjects are a part of the
course. In many cases, topics, assigned to individual students,
are made the basis of class discussion.

Chemistry
The Science for the third year is Chemistry, the
course in which includes the study of First Prin-
ciples of Chemistry, Revised, by Brownlee and Others, for four
periods a week throughout the year. Detailed knowledge of the
17

CHEMICAL LABORATORY

more important elements and their compounds is required. Indi-
vidual laboratory work covering about thirty-six experiments is
carried on for two periods a week and a notebook, written up in
the room by the student himself, is certified by the Master.

Physics
Physics is taught during the Senior year. Carhart
and Chute's First Principles of Physics is the text-
book used for four hours a week. Many numerical problems are
assigned for both class and home work. The two laboratory
periods each week give all the familiarity with the methods of
making physical measurements and recording results that can
be expected in a preparatory course. Each student keeps a record
of his own experiments in a notebook, which is certified by the
Master.

MODERN LANGUAGES
The courses in French, Spanish, and German follow the method
outlined in the Report of the Committee of Twelve on Modern
Languages.
The aim of the instruction is to make it possible for the student
to pronounce correctly, to translate at sight easy prose or poetry,
to put into the language studied simple English sentences based
on everyday life or upon the text read and to answer questions
on the essential points of grammar and syntax.
In order to secure this, drill in pronunciation is begun with the
first lesson and is a constant accompaniment of the instruction.
Systematic efforts are made to build up a vocabulary of common
words and phrases, in order to provide a basis for sight transla-
tion. A thorough drill in the rudiments of grammar and in verb
forms is carried on throughout all the years of the course. That
the new aural tests of the colleges may be met, special attention is
paid to dictation and to the reproduction in English of unprepared
passages read aloud by the Master.
18
The text-books vary somewhat from year to year but generally
include some scientific reading as well as poetry, drama, and
fiction.
German will still be taught in the upper classes in order that
those students who need the points for admission to college will
not lose the work already completed and may secure the two or
three units in a language.

French
In French, the following books have been used:
first year, Fraser and Squair's Grammar, Carter's
Word Lists, Petits Contes de France. In the second year, Al-
drich and Foster's Grammar, Davies' Scientific French Reader,
Ca et La en France, La France Heroique. In the third year,
L'Enfant Espion, and other stories, Trois Comedies, Fables de
La Fontaine, Colomba.

Spanish
The following are the text-books for the year:
first year, Espinosa and Allen's Spanish Grammar,
Ramsay's Spanish Reader. In the second year, Lecturas Faciles,
Correspondencia Comercial.

German
In German the following have been used: second
year, Wesselhoeft's Grammar, Immensee, Waldno-
vellen, Der Wilddieb, Die Journalisten. In the third year: Der
Schwiegersohn, Das Abenteuer der Neujahrnacht, Minna von
Barnhelm.

LATIN
The aim of the Latin course is twofold: to prepare students
for the entrance examinations of any college or scientific school,
and to outline the history, mythology, and literature of Rome for
those who are not to continue these studies in college.
19

The work in the Junior Class is in the lesson book, with con-
stant drill on forms, and on the more common constructions that
are necessary for easy translation.
In the Lower Middle Class, the Second, Third, and Fourth
Books of Csesar are read first, and a close study is made of the
syntax of cases and of modifiers, the object in view being not to
treat the grammar as an acquisition of special value in itself,
but as a means to more rapid and appreciative translation. Dur-
ing this year, as during all others, considerable time is devoted
to sight translation. The First Book of Cassar, on account of
its difficulty, is not read until the second term, when special
emphasis is laid on the principles of Indirect Discourse. Prose
Composition is also made to serve as a basis for the constant
review of. grammatical forms.
Cicero is the author studied in the Upper Middle Class. At
this time the syntax of the verb and the forms of the sentence
receive greater attention. Prose Composition is continued.
In the fourth year, the Aeneid is read along literary rather than
syntactic lines, but the grammatical principles are reviewed in
composition work. The principles of prosody, in so far as they
relate to hexameter verse, are studied.

HISTORY
Two courses are offered in History, for each of which a unit
is given for college entrance.
In the Lower Middle year, English History is taught four
periods a week, Montgomery's English History being used as a
text-book.
During the next year, United States History and Civics are
taken up, for four periods per week, in McMaster's School His-
tory of the United States. Outside topics are assigned to indi-
vidual students and current history is discussed with periodicals
as guides.
20

CURRENT EVENTS
Beginning with the fall of 1917, a systematic effort has been
made by the Head Master to bring the notable events of the
time before the boys in concrete form. This is done not only by
talks at assemblies, when the most important facts about the
World War and the present reconstruction period have been dis-
cussed, but also by the use of a large bulletin board on which ex-
tracts from newspapers, cartoons, pictures, and the like are placed
daily.
Several times a year a printed list of questions on current events
is placed in the hands of each student, half of the questions being
based on subjects discussed in assembly, the other half on what
should be general information obtainable from newspapers and
periodicals. This provides an incentive for personal investigation.
In some cases, a regular test is given on this list; the papers are
corrected, marked and returned. At other times, the questions
form the material for an oral platform "quiz" at a morning
assembly.

Reading Room
In connection with our Current Event Tests, we
have supplied the students with a variety of read-
ing matter, embracing the following, all of which
are on file in the Students' Reading Room: New York Times,
World's Work, Outlook, Collier's Magazine, National Geographic
Magazine, Popular Science Monthly, Literary Digest, as well as
The Stute, and other college publications. For the use of the
Masters, subscriptions have been made to School Science and
Mathematics, Mathematics Teacher, Modern Language Journal,
History Teachers' Magazine, Classical Journal, Educational Re-
view, American Education.


FACULTY
The School is fortunate in retaining the services for next year
of nearly all of the present Faculty. It may be of interest to
parents to know something about the men in whose charge they
place their sons.
The Head Master, Mr. Carter, after graduating from Princeton
University in 1894, received the degree of Master of Arts the
following year. He then studied in Paris, Geneva and Lausanne
and taught for two years in Princeton. For nineteen years he was
instructor in French and Latin in Stevens School. In 1908, he
published French Word-Lists. From 1910 to 1916, he was on the
Board of Education of Glen Ridge, N. J., serving for four years
as Vice President and President. For a time he was President
of the Home and School Association of the Borough and is Asso-
ciate Superintendent of the Congregational Sunday School. He
has been a member of the New Jersey State Militia Reserve for
two years.
Mr. Carter has been Head Master of the School since June,
1917.
Frank J. Davey received his academic education at Marischal
College, Aberdeen University, Scotland. Then he went to the
Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, Edinburgh, from
which he received a certificate of "Honorable Mention" in Physi-
ology and Anatomy, and first class honor certificate in Chemistry.
After a postgraduate course the degree of M.D. was conferred
in 1899 by the Long Island College Hospital. Dr. Davey, for
many years an instructor in the Senior Class, has taught in all
the grades of Stevens School and has rounded out more than a
quarter of a century of service in the institution.
Erwin W. Grove passed a teacher's examination at sixteen and
taught for several years in the small country schools of his native
22

county. Later he worked his own way through Lafayette College
and New York Law School. He also supplemented his college
Chemistry with two summers' work at the University of Pennsyl-
vania. He taught in the Hackensack High School for two years
and then came to Stevens School, where he has been Master of
Chemistry, English History and Chemical Laboratory since 1908.
Henry P. Scratchley studied at Washington and Lee University
and at Griswold College, where he obtained the degrees of A.M.
and B.D. He has taught in St. John's Military Academy, St.
Albans School, and in Stevens School from 1893 to 1908, and
again in 1918. Of his twenty-nine years of teaching, sixteen have
been in this School. He also held the Chair of History in the
General Theological Seminary for two years, and has been Rector
of several Episcopal Churches in this neighborhood and in
Vermont.
John W. McCormack was graduated from Middlebury College
in 1909 with the degree of A.B. He was a member of Phi Beta
Kappa. He studied at McGill University during the summer of
1911 and received the degree of A.M. from Middlebury in 1913.
Since his graduation he has been Principal of several schools in
New York and Massachusetts and from January, 1918, Master of
Science in Stevens School. He is Director of Camp Mont Bleu
for Boys.
Jerome L. Kerbeck obtained the degrees of B.S. and A.M. at
Columbia. lie studied under such eminent academicians as Ed-
ward Lee Thorndike, W. P. Trent, and Brander Matthews. He
has taught the English Language and Literature in the following
schools: Nyack High School, Hasbrouck Institute, Trenton High
School, and Stevens School, 1918, where he has also coached the
students in assembly declamation, and served as Faculty Adviser
for the LEVER.
Donald W. Henry was graduated from Lafayette College in
1912. For two years thereafter he served as Principal of the Far-
num Preparatory School of Beverly, N. J., going from there to
23

Union Hill High School as teacher of Latin and German. He be-
gan his connection with Stevens School in 1918.
Joseph F. Sullivan was graduated from the Buffalo State Nor-
mal School in 1913, and since that time has taught in the Buffalo
Vocational School, Newcomb High School, and Bethlehem Pre-
paratory School before coming to Stevens School in 1918.
L. E. Daniels received the degree of A.B. from the University
of Vermont in 1899. He then studied Modern Languages at
Harvard University. His teaching experience has been obtained
at Heffley Institute, King School, and Lawrenceville School. He
was for three years assistant editor and translator on the staff of
the Trade Mark Bulletin and the Trade Mark Reporter, New
York.
John R. Irwin was graduated from Lafayette College in 1916.
After graduation he was instructor in Mathematics and Coach of
Athletics in Conneaut High School, Ohio, for one year. He then
came to Stevens School for the year 1917-1918. During the sum-
mer of 1918 he entered the Medical Department of the Army;
upon obtaining his discharge he returned to the School as Coach
and Master of Mathematics and English.
Samuel H. Lott was graduated from Stevens School in 1899
and from Stevens Institute of Technology in 1903 with the degree
of M.E. After serving for several years as Instructor he became
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Drawing and Descriptive
Geometry in the Institute. He has had considerable practical ex-
perience in outside drafting rooms in the following lines of work:
Steam Engine, Tempering and Annealing Furnaces, Refrigera-
tion and Ship Repairing. For a number of years he has taught
Mechanical Drawing to the Senior Class in the School.
Miss Benson has served as Secretary and Librarian since 1906.
24

GENERAL INFORMATION
Sessions
The regular school sessions begin at 9.03 a.m. and
end at 2.15 p.m. There are six periods of forty-two
minutes each during the day and a half hour for lunch.
For one hour after 2.15 p.m. the Masters assist students behind
in their work through either inattention or illness, in order to tiy
to bring them up to the passing grade. Those boys who have
failed to recite well during the day or to hand in home work re-
main with their instructors until the failure is made up. Much
of the laboratory work is also done during this period, both in
Physics and Chemistry.

Assembly
At 11.15 the School gathers in the Assembly Hall,
where, after short devotional exercises and the
salute to the flag, there is public speaking by the boys on three
mornings of the week, while on Tuesdays and Thursdays talks
are given by members of the Faculty or invited guests, or the
School joins in singing patriotic and popular songs. During the
past year we have greatly enjoyed and been benefited by listening
to Professor Weston of Stevens Institute of Technology, Profes-
sor Radcliffe Heermance of Princeton University, President John
M. Thomas of Middlebury College, Mr. Barton E. Hedrick, Field
Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., Mr. Harry W. Buxton, who spent
eighteen months on a destroyer in foreign waters, and others, in-
cluding several of our former students who have been in the
service of the country. Nearly all of the Masters have spoken
several times and Dr. Davey has given a series of talks on First
Aid and Bandaging.
In order to give free play to individual ability, the public speak-
ing for the students has been made to cover not merely the de-
livery of a memorized speech, but also talks on subjects on which
25

the speaker is well informed. In this way, we have heard about
airplanes, gasoline motors, shipping, Y. M. C. A., Red Cross,
sword-fishing and a wide variety of other material.
Every two weeks the orchestra plays for the School and the
twenty minutes of assembly are given up to singing.
During the past year a stereopticon has been added to the equip-
ment of the School. On certain Wednesdays, the morning assem-
bly is omitted and the whole School meets at 1.30 in the afternoon
to listen to illustrated lectures. So far this spring the following
lectures have been given: A talk on France by the Head Master,
a talk on Princeton and the activities of the S. A. T. C. by Profes-
sor Radcliffe Heermance, formerly Major and Commandant of
the S. A. T. C. at Georgia Institute of Technology and at Harvard,
and a talk on Building the Victory Ships and Our New Merchant
Marine by Eli Benedict, Lecturer, of New York City. It is ex-
pected that these talks will be supplemented by others, especially
along the lines of History and Science.

Lunchroom
Following the assembly there is a half hour for
lunch. The boys find a well-equipped lunchroom on
the top floor, where good, hot, varied food is served at reasonable
prices. The lunchroom is run by the School under the care of Mrs.
Louisa Kusch. If the students prefer they may eat, either here
or in the assembly hall, their own lunches brought from home.

EXCUSES
In a day school which draws its pupils from a region extend-
ing thirty miles in almost every direction, and in which necessarily
the dependence on the various modes of conveyance is absolute
in all kinds of weather, the subject of excuses has great im-
portance.
To accommodate those living at a distance, the opening of the
School is placed at 9.03. When absolutely necessary, a sufficient
"time allowance" is given to the pupil upon receipt of a letter
26
from the parents, stating the grounds for the request. Parents
are asked to co-operate with the School in seeing that their sons
arrive on time, except under unusual conditions, for, when a
pupil is tardy, he loses a part, and generally an important part,
of the lesson and disturbs the class when he enters. No excuse
should be given for tardiness unless there is a reason assigned.
Boys who are tardy are expected to remain after school for an
extra forty-five minutes.
Pupils are excused for absence from school sessions only on the
presentation of a written excuse from home stating the reasons,
to be brought on the day following the absence. This is so im-
portant a matter that it is the hope of the Head Master that the
parents will observe it in all cases.
Parents should not give excuses to their sons to leave school
before the afternoon session is ended, unless it is absolutely
necessary. Pupils miss, by leaving school before the session is
ended, either the whole or part of a recitation, or of a study
period, in which they might have the help of the teacher in any
difficulty which they may have encountered. The whole time of
the two school sessions is necessary for the school work, neces-
sary for the Masters in teaching, and for the pupils in learning.
All requests to be excused must be in writing, and from parents
or guardian. They are in all cases acted upon by the Head
Master.
No student is permitted to leave school at any time without the
permission of the Head Master. Infringements of this rule will
be severely punished.
It is hoped that appointments for dental work will be made for
such times only as will not interfere with the regular work of the
School. It is very important for the students to remain at school,
not only for recitations, but also for the detention period, which
runs from 2.15 to 3.15, in case their work is not sufficiently high.
Whenever possible, such appointments should be made for
Saturday hours, instead of for school afternoons.
27

PREPARATION FOR COLLEGE
Where shall a boy secure the best possible education as well as
the best preparation for college ? The value to the United States
of the public school system in bringing a good education within
the reach of everyone of school age cannot be overestimated, nor
would the Head Master of Stevens School seek in the least to
minimize it, but the very fact that this opportunity for an educa-
tion is offered to all and that provision must be made for those
who do not go to college gives certain advantages to the private
schools.

Advantages of Private Schools
The private school is not co-educational and, as a
result, the boys find fewer distractions during school
hours and make fewer social engagements for after-
noon and evening.
Again, smaller class sections permit of more detailed and in-
tensive work, each individual pupil securing thereby more of the
instructor's attention both during and out of regular hours.
As the system of promotion is more flexible, less time is lost.
The student body is homogeneous as well as democratic.
Another advantage of many good private schools, and especially
of Stevens School, lies in the fact that, as most of the students
plan to enter college, the teachers, thoroughly conversant with
entrance requirements, direct their energies and the work of their
pupils toward one goal. This can be done in but few high schools,
as, in most, only a small percentage of the student body takes the
college preparatory courses and the preparation cannot readily,
therefore, be as well planned, as detailed and as comprehensive
as in Stevens School.
It is important to note, too, that the students come into contact
with men teachers only, men of experience both in teaching and
handling boys.
In nearly every case, students who have come to us from high
schools have shown a decided improvement in their work.
10
As most of the students of the School desire to go to college,
special efforts are made to prepare them thoroughly and with the
least possible loss of time for whatever institution they wish to
enter. To secure this result, each boy on being admitted to the
School is asked to state his preference as to college at as early a
date as possible; his course is then arranged with reference to
the special requirements for admission. This decision should be
made not later than the beginning of the Upper Middle year.

Certification Privileges
Stevens School has enjoyed certification privileges
for many years from all of the leading institutions
granting admission by this method. Among the
colleges to which recent graduates have been sent on certificate
may be mentioned Stevens Institute of Technology, Cornell, Le-
high, Lafayette, New York University, Wharton School of Fi-
nance, Union, and various law and dental schools. Other boys
have entered, by examination, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, and
Massachusetts Institute of Technology; others have entered, par-
tially by examination and partially by certificate, Syracuse, Rensselaer
Polytechnic, and Williams.
Besides the students who know their own minds and have laid
their plans for college there are always some who have found the
work uncongenial in other schools, boys who have not yet gained
their stride, but who desire to complete a high school education
with the intention of entering college, going into business, or
joining the colors, as seems best at the conclusion of their school
course. We pay special attention to such boys, trying in every
way to give them an opportunity to discover their proper bent
and to encourage them in studious habits.
Aim of Instruction
In general, the aim of instruction is to give the
necessary content of knowledge in each subject, but
still more to develop individuality in thought, accu-
racy in work, clearness in statement.
29

Diplomas
Those students who obtain, either by examination
only or by examination and certificate from other
schools, a grade of 60 per cent in studies aggregating seventy-
two points, are entitled to the school diploma. Of these seventy-
two points, at least fourteen must be in English, ten in Mathe-
matics, ten in Science, ten in Foreign Languages, four in History,
and one in Drawing. A point represents one period per week
throughout the school year, except in Laboratory work, in which
two periods are equal to one of studies requiring preparation.

Certificates
While the passing or diploma grade is sixty, a
certificate for admission to college will be granted
only to those who secure a final grade of sixty-eight in the sub-
jects to be certified. This distinction is necessary, first, for the
protection of the applicant for admission himself, as experience
shows clearly that the boys who succeed in just passing their
school studies with no margin of safety, are generally dropped
from college during Freshman year; second, to protect the cer-
tificate privilege for future classes; third, to protect the reputa-
tion of the School.
In order that this certificate grade may be reached in all of the
subjects required for admission to college, constant application,
continued study, and an ambitious desire to succeed, are necessary.

Home Work
The support and co-operation of the parents are
earnestly sought in this connection. It is the prov-
ince of the School to provide the necessary instruction in all
branches, to train the students in the proper methods of study,
to try to arouse an interest in work, but, as much of the actual
preparation must take place at home, we urge parents to see that,
from Monday to Friday, very few outside engagements be allowed
to interfere with home study. Although all students have at
least one period a day during school hours for preparation of
these lessons, yet the amount of home study should be not less
30

than one and one-half hours during the first two years, and two
and one-half hours during the last two years of the course. This
daily term work must be done conscientiously if the final grade
is to prove satisfactory, as the term marks and the examination
grades are averaged together. The importance, also, of beginning
the year on time and beginning well, of avoiding tardiness and
unnecessary absences, cannot be overstated.

Examinations
Examinations are given to test the thoroughness
of the work done by the student. Formal term
examinations, from two and one-half to three hours in length,
are held at the end of each term. Shorter tests, covering two
periods, are given at the end of each six weeks. The results are
averaged in with the daily marks and the grades permanently
recorded.

Reports
Reports are sent to parents every six weeks through-
out the school year. These give the results of the
six-week periods and of the terms in each subject pursued, to-
gether with a record of attendance, punctuality and deportment.
It is very earnestly requested that parents examine these reports
carefully, affix their signatures and return them to the School
within one week after their receipt.
Reports are due on the following dates: November 3, Decem-
ber 15, February 9, March 22, May 3, June 21.
Special reports of failures in any subject will be sent home
every three weeks. These failures are due in almost every case
to lack of sufficient home study, and if the reports show low
marks, the Head Master requests that the parents take this matter
up at once with their sons, in order that more time may be de-
voted at home to the preparation of the lessons.
31

COMMENCEMENT
1918.
The First Annual Commencement of the School took place on
Friday, June 14, 1918, at 8 p.m., in the auditorium of Stevens
Institute of Technology.
Addresses were made by Rev. Clarence Hall Wilson, D.D., of
Glen Ridge, N. J., and the Head Master. The Salutatory was
delivered by Harry Wilson Roscoe: the Valedictory by Alexander
Morton Mathieson.
Diplomas were presented to the following members of the Class
of 1918:
William E. Blake
William J. Brown
Herman W. Buschen
Clarendon Campbell
Lawrence Chidester
John Cundell
Elliott F. Daniels
Theodore A. Distler
Henry T. Doscher
William J. Drye
Elmer E. Hallinger, Jr.
Arthur K. Harrison
William F. Herbert
Henry R. Hering
George E. Hodgkiss
Frank K. Illinger
Otto F. Keller
G. Clement Kellogg
S. Dana Kimball
Thomas A. Lenci, Jr.
Philip O. Lichtenstein
John R. Maloney
Benjamin Marquez
Alexander M. Mathieson
John D. Mattimore
Edwin F. Merlehan
Harold W. Persbacker
George K. Reilly
Harry W. Roscoe
George E. Schacht
Warner S. Shelly
William E. Stuebner
Ralph D. Terhune
Nicholas McL. Trapnell
Jack H. Warner
John J. Warsaw
John C. Wilcox
Reginald R. Zisette
32

LACROSSE TEAM, 1918

After the graduating exercises, the Class of 1918 held their
Class Day. On the interesting program, besides the remarks by
the President of the Class, Theodore A. Distler, were the Class
History by William J. Drye, the Prophecy by Harold W. Pers-
backer, the Class Poem by Clarendon Campbell, and the Legacies
by William J. Brown.
The School was presented with attractively framed pictures
of Rheims Cathedral and of Stratford-on-Avon as a class gift.
The commencement exercises of the Class of 1919 will be held
on Friday evening, June 13.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
The Stevens School Alumni Association was organized in De-
cember, 1918, with the following officers:
President, R. R. ZISETTE, '18 Secretary, R. D. TERHUNE, '18
Address, 829 Hudson Street, Hoboken, N. J.
It is planned to hold a banquet on June 20, 1919, at which time
the annual election of officers will take place.
24

HONORS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES
Honors
Those students in each class having the highest
general average are placed on the Honor Roll for
each six weeks, for the term, and for the year.
At the graduating exercises held in June, that member of the
Senior Class who has the highest standing for the last three years
is accorded the honor of delivering the Valedictory, while the stu-
dent who stands next highest delivers the Salutatory.
In June, 1918, H. W. Roscoe was the Salutatorian of the class,
and A. M. Mathieson, the Valedictorian.

Scholarships
Through the kindness of the Trustees of Stevens
Institute of Technology, four scholarships in the
Institute are held by the School, one of which is given annually
to that member of the Senior Class who obtains the best average
for the Upper Middle and Senior years. This scholarship is
worth $225 per year, as it consists of the remission of tuition in
the Institute.
The forty-fifth annual competition, June, 1918, resulted in a
practical tie between H. W. Roscoe, and A. M. Mathieson. Upon
the recommendation of the Head Master, the President of Stevens
Institute divided the scholarship equally between these two stu-
dents.

Prizes
The following prizes are offered:
A medal to the student who, in the opinion of the
Faculty and the Student Council, has done the most during the
year to promote the interests of the School. Won, 1918, by W. J.
Brown, 1918. Honorable mention: R. R. Zisette, T. A. Distler,
H. W. Roscoe.
34

A medal for the highest standing for the year in each of the
four classes. Won, 1918: Senior Class, by J. J. Warsaw, 1918;
Upper Middle Class, by R. W. Emerson, 1919; Lower Middle
Class, by A. C. Becker, 1920; Junior Class, by B. E. Roetheli,
1921. Honorable mention: A. M. Mathieson, 1918, F. A. Weid-
mann, 1919, M. A. Laverie, 1920, R. L. Kyte, 1921.
A medal to that member of the Senior Class who has obtained
the highest standing in Algebra throughout the school course.
Won, 1918, by J. J. Warsaw, 1918. Honorable mention, A. M.
Mathieson, 1918.
A medal to that member of the Senior Class who has obtained
the highest standing in both Physics and Chemistry, including
Laboratory work. Won, 1918, by J. J. Warsaw, 1918. Honor-
able mention, H. W. Roscoe, 1918.
A medal to that member of the Senior Class who has obtained
the highest standing in English throughout the school course.
Won, 1918, by A. M. Mathieson, 1918. Honorable mention,
H. W. Roscoe, 1918.
Prizes to those members of the School who write the best es-
says in the annual Prize Essay Contest, inaugurated in 1919.
Won, 1919, by R. A. Wallace, 1919. Second Prize, R. J. Diete-
rich, 1920.
Prizes to those members of the School who write the best short
stories in the annual Prize Short-Story Contest, inaugurated
in 1919.
35

STUDENT ACTIVITIES
Athletics
During the fall of 1918, in order to give an outlet
to our patriotic spirit and to prepare the boys in a
slight degree for the service which it then seemed they would be
called upon to render to their country, military drill was held twice
a week during favorable weather. The students were divided
into three companies, each with a full complement of student of-
ficers. Excellent results were obtained in close order drill and in
the manual of arms.
With the signing of the armistice and with the coming of cold
weather, it seemed best to discontinue the drills, and they will not
be resumed this spring. Instead, an effort is being made to in-
terest as many students as possible in athletics. To secure this
desirable result, candidates have been called out for the following
teams: baseball, lacrosse, track, and tennis. It is hoped and ex-
pected that as many students as can will enter their names for one
or another of these sports, in order to secure the healthy exercise
involved.
The baseball, lacrosse and tennis teams of the spring of 1918
had successful seasons.
During the fall of 1918, the football team, coached by P. J.
Salvatore and L. Durborow of Stevens Institute, did well in its
games, and the basket ball team made a good record this spring.
Mr. Irwin, of our own Faculty, is the basket ball and baseball
coach for 1919.
Athletic Officers 1918-1919
The leaders of the teams have been: Football-
Captain, M. Hammer; Manager, J. S. McKnight.
Basket Ball-Captain, D. Provost; Manager, J. A.
Spratt, Jr. Baseball-Captain, J. A. Spratt, Jr.;
Manager, D. W. Odiorne. Lacrosse-Captain, G. S. Newkirk;
36

Manager, J. S. Radcliffe. Track-Manager, F. W. Mayer.
Tennis-Manager, R. W. Emerson.

Lever
For two years the students of the School have pub-
lished a School Paper, the LEVER. This appears
five or six times during the year. The 1918-1919 staff is made
up of the following men:
Editorial Staff: Editor-in-Chief, F. A. Weidmann, '19; As-
sociate Editor-in-Chief, A. C. Becker, '20; Literary Editor, R. W.
Emerson, '19; Assistant Literary Editor, M. Eisenstein, '19;
Music Editor, R. A. Wallace, '19; Art Editor, F. C. Reiffert, '20;
Athletic Editor, J. S. McKnight, '19; Gossip Editors, J. S. Rad-
cliffe, '19, F. W. Mayer, '19, N. Fischer, '20; Alumni Editor, J. A.
Spratt, Jr., '19; Exchange Editor, G. C. Lewis, '19; Faculty Ad-
viser, J. L. Kerbeck.
Business Staff: Business Manager, G. S. Newkirk, '19; As-
sistant Business Manager, M. Cooke, '20; Advertising Manager,
H. C. Howell, '19; Assistant Advertising Manager, Wm. Hersch-
mann, '19.

Orchestra
This year an orchestra was formed among the mem-
bers of the School, and it has been of great assist-
ance in leading the singing in the assembly and in playing on other
occasions. The membership of the orchestra is as follows:
Leader, R. A. Wallace, Piano; R. G. Vogeler, Flute; H. W.
Van Iderstine, Violin; H. J. Kaht, Violin; G. W. Faurie, Violin;
R. H. Ellis, Traps; J. H. Tietjen, Traps; H. L. De Camp, Trom-
bone ; H. M. Robertson, Mandolin; R. M. Cary, Mandolin; G. S.
Newkirk, Mandolin; F. A. Schreiner, Cornet; Leader of School
Singing, K. A. Butler.
37

STUDENT COUNCIL
Following up the plan begun last year, to give the students an
opportunity to co-operate in promoting the welfare of the School
and to assist by acting as a clearing house for various activities,
both mental and physical, this year's Student Council has been
formed, consisting of the President of each class, the Vice Pres-
ident and Secretary of the Senior Class, and one representative
elected from each of seven sections, the Head Master and Mr.
Irwin serving as Faculty members. The Council organized as fol-
lows : President, R. W. Emerson, '19; Vice President, J. S.
Radcliffe, '19; Secretary, G. S. Newkirk, '19; Members: J. T.
Mahon, '19, P. C. Nelson, Jr., '19, C. Schmidt, '20, F. YV. Schrei-
ner, '20, M. A. Laverie, '20, H. C. Higgins, '21, G. W. Faurie,
'21, B. E. Roetheli, '21, G. Weis, '22, J. H. Vreeland, '22, Mr.
Irwin and Mr. Carter.
In accordance with the Constitution of the Stevens School Ath-
letic Association, the Student Council has awarded the insignia of
the School to the following players on the Football Team of 1918 :
M. Hammer, Captain; J. S. McKnight, Manager; R. W. Emerson,
F. W. Mayer, J. S. Radcliffe, D. L. Provost, W. S. Herschmann,
R. Tonking, D. W. Odiorne, G. S. Newkirk, R. G. Peterson,
A. W. Lentz, A. C. Becker, N. G. Fischer, J. R. Kelly, and the
S. S. A. A. for Football to R. King, H. C. Higgins, E. A. Reed.
The following members of the Basket Ball Team of 1919 have
received the S. S. insignia: D. L. Provost, Captain; J. A. Spratt,
Jr., Manager; R. W. Emerson, J. W. Joralemon, H. Kusel, W. B.
Laytham.
The following members of the Lacrosse Team of 1918 received
the S. S. insignia: W. J. Brown, Captain; G. C. Duryee, Manager;
L. Chidester, W. F. Herbert, J. D. Mattimore, H. W. Buschen,
J. Cundell, W. S. Shelly, G. S. Newkirk, E. R. Reed, D. Provost,
J. C. Becker.
38

HONOR ROLL
Highest standing for the year ending June, 1918.
SENIOR CLASS, 1918.
J. J. WARSAW
H. W. ROSCOE
A. M. MATHIESON
J. D. MATTIMORE
R. R. ZISETTE
UPPER MIDDLE CLASS, 1919.
R. W. EMERSON
F. A. WEIDMANN
H. F. MEYER
G.S. NEWKIRK
H.C. HOWELL
D. W. ODIORNE
F. M. TRAPNELL
V. F. EVANS
E.R. REED
F.S. DALE
F. W. MAYER
LOWER MIDDLE CLASS, 1920.
A. C. BECKER
M. A. LAVERIE
J. G. L. MOLLOY
C. A. SCHMIDT
J. C. BECKER
JUNIOR CLASS, 1921.
B. E. ROETHELI
R. L. KYTE
39

HONOR ROLL
Highest standing for the half year ending January 31, 1919.
SENIOR CLASS, 1919.
E.S. TUTHILL
R. W. EMERSON
D. W. ODIORNE
H. F. MEYER
A. G. GALE
F. A. WEIDMANN
H. C. HOWELL
H. F. POLHEMUS
F. S. DALE
R. TONKING
F. F. FUHRMAN
C. E. NEUMANN
F.W. MAYER
UPPER MIDDLE CLASS, 1920.
A. C. BECKER
P. CARDINAL
L. HUBBELL
M. LAVERIE
F. W. SCHREINER
F. D. OLTMANN
LOWER MIDDLE CLASS, 1921.
B. E. ROETHELI
JUNIOR CLASS, 1922.
J. H. VREELAND
W. VOLCKHAUSEN
40

FOOTBALL SQUAD, 1918

CLASS ORGANIZATIONS
1918-1919
SENIOR CLASS
President, RALPH W. EMERSON
Vice President, GEORGE S. NEWKIRK
Secretary, JOHN T. MAHON
Treasurer, JOSEPH A. SPRATT, JR.
UPPER MIDDLE CLASS
President, CHARLES SCHMIDT
Vice President, JOHN J. MCCARTHY
Secretary, MARTIN COOICE
Treasurer, CHARLES GOOD
LOWER MIDDLE CLASS
President, HAROLD C. HIGGINS
Vice President, CHARLES H. FINKE
Secretary, MELVIN F. RYER
Treasurer, ROBERT F. STEPBACH
JUNIOR CLASS
President, GERALD WEIS
Vice President, ERICH K. ZIMMERMANN
Secretary, ALBIN D. EDELMAN
Treasurer, PAUL M. HART
41

SCHOOL CALENDAR, 1919-1920
1919
MAY 30, Friday: Decoration Day, holiday.
JUNE 4, 5, 6, 9,10,11: Examinations on work of Second Term.
JUNE 13, Friday: Second Annual Graduating Exercises, 8 p.m.
JUNE 4-30: Registration days for applicants for admission.
AUGUST 25-SEPTEMBER 12: Registration days.
SEPTEMBER 11-12: Examinations for conditioned and entering
students.
SEPTEMBER 15, Monday: School reopens for the First Term.
NOVEMBER 4, Tuesday: Election Day, holiday.
NOVEMBER 26, Wednesday: School closes for the Thanksgiving
recess.
DECEMBER 1, Monday: School reopens.
DECEMBER 19, Friday: School closes for the Christmas vacation.
Alumni Meeting, 12.30 p.m.
1920.
JANUARY 5, Monday: School reopens.
JANUARY 26-30: Examinations on work of First Term.
FEBRUARY 2, Monday: Second Term begins.
FEBRUARY 12, Thursday: Lincoln's Birthday, holiday.
FEBRUARY 23-27: Re-examinations on work Of First Term.
MARCH 30, Tuesday: School closes for the Easter vacation.
APRIL 5, Monday: School reopens.
JUNE 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9: Examinations on work of Second Term.
JUNE 11, Friday: Third Annual Graduating Exercises, 8 p.m.
JUNE 2-30: Registration days for applicants for admission.
SEPTEMBER 13, Monday: School reopens for the First Term.
42

STUDENTS, 1918-1919
SENIOR CLASS
AULT, HAROLD MBloomfield, N. J.
BERRIGAN, JOHN BOrange, N. J.
BLANCHARD, CLINTON F.Boonton, N. J.
BUTLER, KENNETH ASummit, N. J.
COENE, EMILEPaterson, N. J.
COLBY, FRANKLIN HAndover, N. J.
DALE, F. SLADENew York, N. Y.
DE CAMP, HAROLD LLong Branch, N. J.
DECKER, EVERETT JMountain Lakes, N. J.
DE LA MARE, ALPHEUS T., JR.Oradell, N. J.
DWYER, EDWARD JKearny, N. J.
EHRICH, HENRY CJersey City, N. J.
EISENSTEIN, MILTONBrooklyn, N. Y.
ELLIS, REGINALD HJersey City, N. J.
EMERSON, RALPH WRidgefield Park, N. J.
EUSTIS, RICHARD CNew York, N. Y.
EVANS, VICTOR FNew York, N. Y.
FERRIS, EDWIN ARidgefield Park, N. J.
FISHER, CHARLES F. HBoonton, N. J.
FUHRMAN, FREDERICK F., JR.Jersey City, N. J.
GALE, ALFRED G., JRUnion Hill, N. J.
HAMMER, MAURICERidgefield Park, N. J.
HERSCHMANN, WILLIAM SNew York, N. Y.
HOFFER, CLARENCE WArlington, N. J.
HOWELL, H. CLAYBoonton, N.J.
JOLINE, FRANK ATottenvillc, N. Y.
JORALEMON, JOHN WNewark, N. J.
KELLS, CHARLES FAstoria, N. Y.
KING, H. RUSSELLDover, N. J.
KITCHEN, HARVEY BSuffern, N.Y.
KRONENDERG, J. RAYMONDBemardsville, N. J.
LAYTHAM, WILLIAM BPassaic, N. J.


LEAYCRAFT, JOHN WSouth Nyack, N. Y.
LEWIS, GORDON CJersey City, N. J.
MCCAUSLAN, GEORGE HWeehawken, N. J.
MCKNIGHT, JOHN SJersey City, N. J.
MAHON, JOHN TRidgefield Park, N. J.
MAYER, F. WARDNew York, N. Y.
MEYER, HAROLD FWeehawken, N. J.
MOWER, GEORGE ONewark, N. J.
MOYNIHAN, ROBERT NNew York, N. Y.
NELSON, PETER C., JRMountain Lakes, N. J.
NEUMANN, CHARLES EHasbrouck Heights, N. J.
NEWKIRK, GEORGE SJersey City, N.J.
ODIORNE, DAVID WElizabeth, N. J.
PETERSON, RAYMOND GWest Englewood, N. J.
POLHEMUS, HARVEY F.South Nyack, N. Y.
PROVOST, DONALD LHackensack, N. J.
RADCLIFFE, JAMES SPaterson, N. J.
REED, EDWIN AJersey City, N. J.
RICHARDS, SELDEN SCranford, N. J.
ROBERTSON, HAROLD MJersey City, N. J.
SCHOEPPS, GEORGE WRidgefield Park, N. J.
SHAW, FREDERICK R.Jersey City, N. J.
SMITH, DONALD FNew York, N. Y.
SMITH, W. WARD, JRSparkill, N. Y.
SPEER, JOHN KJersey City, N. J.
SPINDLER, HENRYJersey City, N. J.
SPRAGUE, JOHN WRidgewood, N. J.
SPRATT, JOSEPH A., JRJersey City, N. J.
STUEBNER, GEORGE LLong Island City, N.Y.
SULLIVAN, ALBERT CNew York, N. Y.
THOMSON, HERBERT SWesterleigh, N. Y.
THUM, FREDERICK LNewark, N. J.
TOMPSON, SCHUYLER WBloomfield, N. J.
TONKING, RUSSELLDover, N. J.
TRAPNELL, FREDERICK MElizabeth, N.J.
TUTHILL, ELMER SJersey City, N. J.
VAN IDERSTINE, HENRY WMaplewood, N. J.
VOGELER, RAYMOND E-Newark, N. J.
WAGNER, CHARLES HHillside, N. J.
WALLACE, ROBERT ANewark, N. J.
WEIDMANN, FREDERICK APaterson, N. J.
*WELLER, WARREN F. Weehawken, N. J.
YOUNG, J. IRVING Jersey City, N. J.


UPPER MIDDLE CLASS
BASSO, CHARLESNew York, N.Y.
BECKER, ANDREW CNewark, N. J.
BECKER, JOSEPH CTompkinsville, N. Y.
BERTUCH, NORMAN PBoonton, N. J.
BLACK, WILLIAM NWeehawken, N. J.
BLOWERS, MEROLD TBoonton, N. J.
BOCK, MARCUS LNewark, N. J.
BOEHM, NORMAN CDover, N. J.
BROWER, LORENZO DPlainfield, N. J.
BURIAN, JOHNNew York, N. Y.
CARDINAL, PAUL JPaterson, N. J.
COOKE, MARTIN W., JRHoboken, N. J.
DANZBERGER, NORMAN ENew York, N. Y.
DE CICCO, JOHNNew York, N. Y.
DIETERICH, RALPHEast Orange, N. J.
DWYER, EDWARD P., JRoBrooklyn, N. Y.
FALLS, THOMAS J., JRNew York, N. Y.
FISCHER, NILS GNew York, N. Y.
FLOYD, F. RUSSELLGlens Falls, N. Y.
Fox, JAMES JHoboken, N. J.
GOOD, CHARLES KUnion Hill, N. J.
GOOD, RICHARDUnion Hill, N. J.
GREGSON, JOHNNew York, N.Y.
GRENZBACH, FRANK WNew York, N. Y.
GREVE, JOHNJersey City, N. J.
HOFFMAN, JACKNew York, N. Y.
HOFFMANN, HUGO RWeehawken, N.J.
HORWOOD, EDWARD HHoboken, N. J.
HUBBELL, LUMAN GNew York, N. Y.
IRVING, WILLIAM CTompkinsville, N. Y.
JOLLY, PHILIAS J., JRBrooklyn, N. Y.
KELLY, GEORGE EPassaic, N. J.
KELLY, LOUIS GEast Orange, N. J.
KELLY, RAYMOND HEast Orange, N. J.
*Deceased.

KUSEL, HENRY, JR.Jersey City, N. J.
LAVERIE, MARSHALL AMariners Harbor, N. Y.
LENTZ, AUGUST W., JRJersey City, N. J.
LISSENDEN, PERCIVAL CMariners Harbor, N. Y.
MCCARTHY, JOSEPH JHoboken, N. J.
MCILRAVY, GILBERT HWeehawken, N. J.
MORSE, STANLEY Suffern, N. Y.
OELHAF, CARL F., JRLeonia, N. J.
OLTMANN, CHARLES DNew York, N. Y.
OLTMANN, FREDERICK TNew York, N. Y.
PRICE, FRANK WUnion Hill, N. J.
REIFFERT, FRANK CEast Orange, N.J.
SCHMIDT, CHARLES A., JRJersey City, N.J.
SCHREINER, FRANK WBrooklyn, N. Y.
SNEDEN, MELVILLE FHackensack, N. J.
SOURS, CHARLES RBound Brook, N. J.
STEWART, MORTON CElmhurst, N. Y.
UIJCH, ERLING HNew York, N. Y.
WITT, WILLIAM HJersey City, N. J.
WOOD, HENRY PNew York, N.Y.
LOWER MIDDLE CLASS
ACKERMAN, GEORGEHoboken, N. J.
AMMON, ALBERT G.Jersey City, N. J.
ASLANIAN, MYRONBayonne, N.J.
AYERS, BENJAMIN HNewark, N.J.
BEGLINGER, CHARLES J. WWeehawken, N. J.
BENSON, HAROLD JWest New York, N. J.
BOYNTON, HINSDALEWoodbridge, N. J.
BRADLEY, JAMES KEast Orange, N. J.
CAREY, GEORGE RJersey City, N. J.
CARY, RAYMOND MPlainfield, N.J.
CHRISTENSEN, HAROLD PBrooklyn, N. Y.
DAVIES, VERNON AMadison, N. J.
DURIE, LEROYPaterson, N. J.
EMERSON, MILTON K.Ridgefield Park, N. J.
FATES, GILBERT HOrange, N. J.
FAURIE, GEORGE WWest Hoboken, N. J.
FINKE, CHARLES I-IJersey City, N. J.
46

GOOD, ALEXANDERUnion Hill, N. J.
GREBENSTEIN, WALTER AWeehawken, N. J.
HAAS, LOUIS R. . . . Weehawken, N. J.
HIGGINS, HAROLD CJersey City, N.J.
HOGG, WILLIAM CMountain Lakes, N. J.
HOPPER, ANDREW FHoboken, N. J.
KAHT, HERMAN JJersey City, N. J.
KELLY, JAMES RPassaic, N. J.
KYTE, ROBERT LA WJersey City, N. J.
LIVINGSTON, FRANCIS EBelleville, N. J.
MARSCHALL, AUGUST LWeehawken, N. J.
MESSINA, NICHOLAS LBayside, N. Y.
MEYER, THEODORE RJersey City, N.J.
MOSTOWITZ, MICHAELJersey City, N.J.
OBERLE, ARTHUR 0New York, N. Y.
PINSAN, PHILIPWest Hoboken, N. J.
RAMSDALE, FREDERICKBasking Ridge, N.J.
RIESENBERGER, J. LLOYDWeehawken, N. J.
RIKER, CHARLES HRutherford, N. J.
ROBERTS, NORMAN T. Newark, N. J.
ROETHELI, BRUNO EHawthorne, N.J.
RUBSAMEN, HERBERT S.Murray Hill, N.J.
RYER, MELVIN FJersey City, N.J.
SANDER, GEORGE FNew York, N. Y.
SANDERSON, ROBERT OEast Orange, N. J.
SIMKHOVITCH, STEPHEN K.New York, N. Y.
SMART, ROBERT H.East Orange, N.J.
SMITH, HERBERT LHoboken, N. J.
SMITH, WOODRUFFNewark, N.J.
STEPBACH, ROBERT FNorth Bergen, N. J.
SULLIVAN, STEPHEN KWeehawken, N. J.
TIETJEN, JOHN HWest New York, N. J.
WANNER, NORBERT H.New York, N. Y.
WANSTALL, WLLLIAMRoslington, N.J.
WEISBART, MELVIN CHoboken, N. J.
WESSMAN, HERBERT CMountain Lakes, N. J.
47

JUNIOR CLASS
BERTUCH, EDWIN HBoonton, N. J.
BOHLING, WILFORD CWoodcliff, N. J.
CLEAVER, DAVID HPaterson, N. J,
CROSSING, SAMUEL LPlainfield, N. J.
CUPPARO, LOUIS FJersey City, N. J.
DEGENHARDT, ALFRED PJersey City, N. J.
DIETRICH, GEORGE JBrooklyn, N. Y.
EDELMAN, ALBIN DBoonton, N.J.
FISCHER, WALTER ENew York, N. Y.
GIBBS, FREDERICK CBogota, N. J.
GRAUERT, E. ROBERTWest New York, N.J.
GUNN, JOHN WJersey City, N.J.
HART, PAUL MMorristown, N. J.
LAUTERBACH, GEORGE EWest New York, N. J.
LAYTHAM, W. ALLISONPassaic, N.J.
MC SPIRIT, J. RAYMONDJersey City, N. J.
OVENS, R. EDMUNDJersey City, N. J.
PATTBERG, EUGENE PJersey City, N. J.
REZOS, GEORGEHackensack, N. J.
ROWE, NORMAN L., JRJersey City, N. J.
Russ, RAYMONDJersey City, N. J.
SCHUSTER, RALPH WWeehawken, N. J.
SELTZER, HENRI EWeehawken, N. J.
SPIEGEL, SIDNEY THoboken, N. J.
TOCHTERLE, ROLAND KUnion Hill, N. J.
VAN VLECK, DURBIN HBrooklyn, N. Y.
VAN ZILE, CORNELIUS RWeehawken, N. J.
VOGEL, HAROLD ABayonne, N. J.
VOLCKHAUSEN, WALTER JWeehawken, N. J.
VREELAND, JACOB HEast Rutherford, N.J.
WEIS, GERALDNyack, N. J.
WILLBERG, WILLIAM ABogota, N. J.
WILSON, IRVING CHoboken, N. J.
ZIMMERMANN, CHARLES WUnion Hill, N. J.
ZIMMERMANN, ERICH KPassaic, N. J.
48

BASEBALL TEAM, 1918

[end]




Date 1918-1919
Year Range from 1918
Year Range to 1919
Search Terms Stevens Preparatory School
Stevens Academy
Sixth St.
Park Ave.
Hoboken High School
Martha Institute
Caption front cover
Imagefile 080\20110010003.TIF
Classification Schools
Education
Children
Sports
Ceremonies