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Name Bergen Tunnel
Details Also known as Bergen Hill Tunnel. Built by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co. (Morris & Essex Division 1876; D.L. & W. 1908.) Two double-track railroad tunnels west of the approaches to the D.L. & W. yard and terminal in Hoboken and freight yards in Jersey City.

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Excerpt from:
Rehabilitation of the Bergen Tunnel (2003)
http://www.arema.org/files/library/2003_Conference_Proceedings/0061.pdf

The Bergen Tunnel consists of two double track tubes. The North and the South Tubes were constructed as a means of providing an extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad [cataloger's note: actually Morris & Essex Railroad and D.L. & W. - see above) and are located west of the Hudson River passing through Hoboken and Jersey City in New Jersey. The Bergen Hill, through which the Bergen Tunnel passes, has an average height of 91 feet above ordinary high water. The railway track in the tunnel is 10 feet above high water at its eastern end, and 17 feet above high water at its summit, which is about 500 feet from the western end.

The North Tube was constructed in 1876, contains two tracks and has an overall length is 4280 feet from the outside face to the outside face of the East and West Portals. It is intermittently brick-lined through rock cut throughout its length. The tube is approximately 27 feet wide and the arch of the lined segments has an approximate 20 ft center radius with 9 ft side radii. The track assembly consists of welded steel rails, treated wood ties, and 1 to 2 feet of stone ballast, atop the existing rock below. The sidewalls in the lined section is comprised of cut stone blocks which is approximately 2 ft thick and has grouted rubble backing. Atop the walls are stone caps approximately two feet thick. The arch is comprised of a five course brick lining approximately
22 inches thick, surmounting the stone caps. The North Tube has five abandoned vertical airshafts. Four shafts are approximately 10 ft by 28 ft in cross section and one shaft is 7’-8” by 17 ft in cross section. The shafts were originally used to vent steam engine locomotive smoke from the tunnel. The bottom portion of theairshafts, (at the tunnel ceiling level) have been sealed with a reinforced concrete slab. The tracks are
powered by a catenary system, which is supported from brackets mounted to the tunnel ceiling.

The South Tube built in 1908 has also two tracks measures 4,280 ft long and about 30 ft wide. It has vertical sidewalls up to spring-line and a semicircular arch above. Contrary to the North Tube, the South Tube was not lined with stones and bricks, but was constructed completely with a concrete lining of about two feet in thickness for the entire length. Some of the groundwater that finds its way to the tunnel lining is collected by a network of horizontal and vertical pipes that is embedded in the wall pour and discharge directly onto the track ballast. The track assembly consists of welded steel rails, treated wood ties, and one to two feet of stone ballast atop an 8 feet wide concrete slab below each track. The South Tube has three abandoned vertical airshafts ranging in height from approximately 47 ft to 66 ft from the tunnel ceiling to street level. Each one is approximately 10 ft by 30 ft in cross section. The bottoms of these airshafts have been sealed at the tunnel roof level with reinforced concrete slabs similar to the shafts of the North Tube. The tracks are powered by an overhead catenary system, which are supported by common ceiling mounted support.
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Number of Archive records 2
Number of Object records 0
Number of Library records 3
Number of Photo records 1

Associated Records

Image of Article, Bergen Tunnel: A Special Type of Track Construction for Tunnels & Subways. Engineering News, Aug. 19, 1909. - Article

Article, Bergen Tunnel: A Special Type of Track Construction for Tunnels & Subways. Engineering News, Aug. 19, 1909. - Article

A Special Type of Track Construction for Tunnels and Subways. Article published in Engineering News, Vol. 62, No. 8, August 19, 1909, pp. 191-192. Two leaves removed from publication as received. Full text of article in notes. The Bergen Tunnel, two double track tunnels, that were constructed by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad just west of approaches to its yards and terminal in Hoboken and yards in Jersey City. Figure 1: photo looking into one tunnel with double tracks. Caption: Special Track Construction in the New Bergen Hill Tunnel of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western R.R. (Lincoln Bush, M. Am. Soc. C.E.; Inventor.) Figures 2 to 5 are drawings Fig. 2: Cross Sec

Image of Article (D.L. & W. R.R.): A Heavy Floor for a Double-Track Bridge. Engineering Record, Vol. 61, No. 3, Jan. 13, 1910. - Article

Article (D.L. & W. R.R.): A Heavy Floor for a Double-Track Bridge. Engineering Record, Vol. 61, No. 3, Jan. 13, 1910. - Article

Article (D.L. & W. R.R.): A Heavy Floor for a Double-Track Bridge. Engineering Record, Volume 61, Number 3, January 13, 1910. Two leaves as removed from publication; article on pages 76-77 with multiple diagrams. PDF on file. This bridge was designed and built by the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad at the western end of the Bergen Tunnel in Jersey City. The two tracks were actually part of the Erie Railroad, but were used by the D.L. & W. R.R. for traffic to Lackawanna Terminal and railyards in Hoboken.

Image of U.S. Camera, Vol. IV, No. 2 - Periodical

U.S. Camera, Vol. IV, No. 2 - Periodical

U.S. Camera, Vol. IV, No. 2. August 1941. 16-page photo illustrated article, pp, 39-54: "Hoboken: The photographers' forbidden paradise" by Marjory Collins and Wilfrid Zogbaum. Both authors did the photography and are pictured in the article. Collins was an associate editor of the magazine.

U.S. Camera, Vol. IV, No. 2 - Periodical

U.S. Camera, Vol. IV, No. 2. August 1941. 16-page photo illustrated article, pp, 39-54: "Hoboken: The photographers' forbidden paradise" by Marjory Collins and Wilfrid Zogbaum. Both authors did the photography and are pictured in the article. Collins was an associate editor of the magazine. See library catalog 2002.191.0001 for copy with images of the article.

Image of Sepia-tone photogravure portrait of Charles M. Jacobs in engraved silverplate presentation frame dated N.Y., May 7th, 1908.
Sepia-tone photogravure portrait of Charles M. Jacobs in engraved silverplate presentation frame dated N.Y., May 7th, 1908.
 - Photogravure

Sepia-tone photogravure portrait of Charles M. Jacobs in engraved silverplate presentation frame dated N.Y., May 7th, 1908. Sepia-tone photogravure portrait of Charles M. Jacobs in engraved silverplate presentation frame dated N.Y., May 7th, 1908. - Photogravure

Sepia-tone photogravure portrait of Charles M. Jacobs in engraved silverplate presentation frame dated N.Y., May 7th, 1908. Engraved at lower right: NEW YORK May 7th, 1908. Presented by William Bradley, Contractor, on the occasion of the through connection of the PENN. R.R. TUNNELS into NEW YORK by the meeting of THE BERGEN HILL TUNNELS. CHARLES M. JACOBS, CHIEF ENGINEER. Domed-top silverplated decorated table frame, no glass; 8-3/4" high x 9-5/8" wide; blue velvet insert back with folding easel. Bottom edge marked at center, stamped lettering: Mfd. & plated by Reed & Barton 73 Frame may be considered as Arts-and-craft, Mission or Secessionist style. ---- Jacobs